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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

617: Page 1, Panel 3



A plane collides with another in midair and the group of survivors crash into the Rocky Mountains. From there, it is something of a road story; the group trying to get back to society and what happens when they get back to “civilization” (it’s extremely crucial that "civilization" is in quotes). As they are attempting to trek down the mountain the group splits apart and comes across survivors from the other plane as well as many characters who know much more about their predicament then they are letting on. It’s sort of a mix of Y: The Last Man meets Christian and Norse mythologies. It is also (perhaps most importantly) a literal clash of Technology vs. Religion. You’ll see Valkyries, The Four Horsemen (who are evil/questionable historical figures you’ll certainly recognize who are attempting to earn their way back into God’s good graces,) Fenrir the Wolf, a few choice Angels and even the good ol' Antichrist makes an appearance (who may not appear as you might typically think about the Anti-Christ). We blend a lot of different mythologies and attempt to find the answer to "Life, the Universe and Everything" (hint: it's not 42).

Written by: Phillip Butehorn & Brian J. Harris
Art by: Jacob Eguren
Colored by: Luis Caballero
Lettered by: Justin Korthof
617 Logo by: Shawn Aldridge


Stay tuned for Page 1, Panel 3 on Thursday


Page 1, Panel 1

Page 1, Panel 2

Page  1, Pane 3 






Monday, August 18, 2014

617: Page 1, Panel 2




A plane collides with another in midair and the group of survivors crash into the Rocky Mountains. From there, it is something of a road story; the group trying to get back to society and what happens when they get back to “civilization” (it’s extremely crucial that "civilization" is in quotes). As they are attempting to trek down the mountain the group splits apart and comes across survivors from the other plane as well as many characters who know much more about their predicament then they are letting on. It’s sort of a mix of Y: The Last Man meets Christian and Norse mythologies. It is also (perhaps most importantly) a literal clash of Technology vs. Religion. You’ll see Valkyries, The Four Horsemen (who are evil/questionable historical figures you’ll certainly recognize who are attempting to earn their way back into God’s good graces,) Fenrir the Wolf, a few choice Angels and even the good ol' Antichrist makes an appearance (who may not appear as you might typically think about the Anti-Christ). We blend a lot of different mythologies and attempt to find the answer to "Life, the Universe and Everything" (hint: it's not 42).

Written by: Phillip Butehorn & Brian J. Harris
Art by: Jacob Eguren
Colored by: Luis Caballero
Lettered by: Justin Korthof
617 Logo by: Shawn Aldridge

Page 1, Panel 1





Page 1, Panel 2

 
 Stay tuned for Panel 3 on Wednesday!











617: Page 1, Panel 1


A plane collides with another in midair and the group of survivors crash into the Rocky Mountains. From there, it is something of a road story; the group trying to get back to society and what happens when they get back to “civilization” (it’s extremely crucial that "civilization" is in quotes). As they are attempting to trek down the mountain the group splits apart and comes across survivors from the other plane as well as many characters who know much more about their predicament then they are letting on. It’s sort of a mix of Y: The Last Man meets Christian and Norse mythologies. It is also (perhaps most importantly) a literal clash of Technology vs. Religion. You’ll see Valkyries, The Four Horsemen (who are evil/questionable historical figures you’ll certainly recognize who are attempting to earn their way back into God’s good graces,) Fenrir the Wolf, a few choice Angels and even the good ol' Antichrist makes an appearance (who may not appear as you might typically think about the Anti-Christ). We blend a lot of different mythologies and attempt to find the answer to "Life, the Universe and Everything" (hint: it's not 42).



The Creative Team:

Written by: Phillip Butehorn & Brian J. Harris
Art by: Jacob Eguren
Colored by: Luis Caballero
Lettered by: Justin Korthof
617 Logo by: Shawn Aldridge

Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Killing and the Twist You Didn't Ask For


    SPOILER ALERT FOR SEASON FOUR

   I don’t know what initially drew me to The Killing but I also don’t know what could possibly drag me away. As an avid watcher of The Killing for all of its four seasons (and honestly, one of only four watchers I know of this underappreciated drama), I feel the series’ only problem was its last few minutes. If you didn’t like the last season, you probably didn’t like the previous three. It did everything the show did well: season long mystery ala Twin Peaks, in-depth protagonists that were easy to dislike, supporting characters that were both complex and well-acted, and a bleak and hopeless tone.

       However, the last few minutes of season four were basically a complete copout for what the show was and represented, but more on that in a minute. This was a show that offered no hope and no happiness. And goddamnit, that’s okay. There was absolutely no positivity to this dark presentation; only an unhappy and, arguably accurate, view of humanity (and the rainy, dreary, Seattle). The end of each season offered answers (and some didn’t even do that) but they tended to stray towards the unhappy. And this was completely and utterly consistent with the direction we were led for 12 or so episodes each season. Rosie Larson’s murder was wrapped up neatly and particularly dishearteningly, as the revelation of her killer was someone so close to her, and someone seemingly completely innocent. The fact that this revelation took two seasons was a bit disappointing, but still worth the time and journey.

       Season 3 was equally tragic as the Pied Piper ended up being none other than Linden’s former lover and also current (as of the time) lover: Lieutenant Skinner. MY first thought when beginning season 3 was that every single male character on the show would be at one point suspected (except Holder) including new main character Lieutenant Skinner. Turns out I was more correct than I could have anticipated.

       For the series as a whole, the fact that every single episode offers a new possible “suspect” only to be exonerated by the end of the 42 minutes, which happens far too often, actually weighs lightly on the viewer as each new suspect presents the observer with an in-depth look at a disturbing character, even though they often have absolutely nothing to do with the case at hand. This does make most of each season predictable to a point, as you know the real killer (or any possible clues/details about the killer) will not be revealed until the last two episodes. However, these revelations are always (and I mean that for all four seasons) worth the wait as they wrap up all questions, suspects and details.

       The end of the series changes the dreary, bleak, gray, unhappy tone of the show to one of hope and looking to the future by placing the miserable-unless-looking-for-a-murderer Linden and the street-savvy former drug addict Holder in a suggested romantic relationship. Wait-what?! The show that placed almost no importance on romance (save for Holder’s relationship with Kaylee from Firefly turned District Attorney) decided to shove the two main characters together for….for what? Why did they do this? There was never for a second a hint of a will-they-won’t-they relationship between Holder and Linden. This was not Sam and Diane or Ross and Rachel. This was a heavily serialized murder mystery show that showed the darkness of the world. Not once did it suggest a happy, romantic ending for the two protagonists. It pained me to do it, but I had to give this show four out of five stars on Netflix because of the last three minutes of the show. Everything up until then was completely consistent, but the ending offered the viewer an ending it did not ask for or want. Or indeed make any sense at all. That being said, this was approximately 2000 minutes of fantastic drama with 3 total minutes of head-scratching resolution. You’ll have to forgive and forget the creators their last second faux pas and enjoy the show as it was.

Monday, August 4, 2014

SDCC'14: MUST SEE MOVIE TRAILERS

“The Hobbit: the Battle of the Five Armies”



Yes the conclusion to “the Hobbit” trilogy is coming to a close and most of us couldn't be happier.  I questioned the making of this trilogy as the story is just much more child friendly than the gritty “Lord of the Rings.”  Perhaps Mr. Jackson will pull one out of his sleeve to redeem a somewhat ho-hum project.

“The Simpson’s/Family Guy Crossover”



Yes indeed, it has finally happened.  Despite the fact that hardcore Simpson’s fans tend to view Family Guy as a knockoff (excluding myself cuz come on, how can you make a cartoon that doesn't in some way rip off our friends from Springfield).  Based on the teaser scenes it looks great, love the Duff/Pawtucket Patriot gag!!

“Mad Max: Fury Road”



The colon titles continue!  This has the potential to be fantastic!!  With George Miller (the man behind the original Max stories) in charge you just know it will have that same dark feel to it.  Tom Hardy gives us a great replacement for Mel Gibson in the title role in a film that will be released 30 years since the last installment.

“Interstellar”



Well it is Nolan so it’s got to be awesome, right?  Yes, most likely.  With the release of the new trailer, the buzz will begin to increase for this highly anticipated project from one of the great minds in film today.  Will shooting for the stars work as well for Nolan as it did for Kubrick with 2001? We will find out sometime this fall.


Monday, July 28, 2014

Nerdi's SDCC Announcement: 617 Cover

See you at NYCC'14. 

P.S. The cover itself tells a story. Click on it, scroll up and down, and see if you can figure it out.





Here's the premise: A plane collides with another in midair and the group of survivors crash into the Rocky Mountains. From there, it is something of a road story; the group trying to get back to society and what happens when they get back to “civilization” (it’s extremely crucial that "civilization" is in quotes). As they are attempting to trek down the mountain the group splits apart and comes across survivors from the other plane as well as many characters who know much more about their predicament then they are letting on. It’s sort of a mix of Y: The Last Man meets Christian and Norse mythologies. It is also (perhaps most importantly) a literal clash of Technology vs. Religion. You’ll see Valkyries, The Four Horsemen (who are evil/questionable historical figures you’ll certainly recognize who are attempting to earn their way back into God’s good graces,) Fenrir the Wolf, a few choice Angels and even the good ol' Antichrist makes an appearance (who may not appear as you might typically think about the Anti-Christ). We blend a lot of different mythologies and attempt to find the answer to "Life, the Universe and Everything" (hint: it's not 42).
The Creative Team:

Written by: Phillip Butehorn & Brian J. Harris
Art by: Jacob Eguren
Colored by: Luis Caballero
Lettered by: Justin Korthof
617 Logo by: Shawn Aldridge


Wednesday, July 9, 2014

The Next Big Thing on TV

      If you're not excited for the TV adaptation of American Gods you should be. Written by the master of modern fantasy, Neil Gaiman, American Gods is described in the official press release thusly: "The plot posits a war brewing between old and new gods: the traditional gods of biblical and mythological roots from around the world steadily losing believers to an upstart pantheon of gods reflecting society’s modern love of money, technology, media, celebrity and drugs.  Its protagonist, Shadow Moon, is an ex-con who becomes bodyguard and traveling partner to Mr. Wednesday, a conman but in reality one of the older gods, on a cross-country mission to gather his forces in preparation to battle the new deities." 

          Intrigued yet?
       This just longs to be adapted for television. Notice I said television, NOT a movie. The content of this novel is just too rich, too dense and too thorough to be dealt with in two hours. 
       HBO had attempted to do an adaptation before but it proved too difficult to adapt. But Starz has found the right mix of creators to take it on. Michael Green (Heroes, the sincerely underrated Kings and the likewise under-appreciated 2011 show, The River) and Bryan Fuller (Hannibal, Dead Like Me, and one of my personal favorites Pushing Daisies) are finally realizing Neil Gaiman's ambitious vision. Gaiman will also serve as Producer for the show. There are many reasons this is the perfect trio to get this done. Most importantly, these three know how to deal with a mythology. One of the best parts of Heroes was its thorough and complex mythology. It did a good job dealing with complicated characters and their back stories. Fuller is no stranger to dealing with mythologies as Dead Like Me, Pushing Daisies, Wonderfalls and Hannibal all had intense mythologies.
       The most shocking part about this announcement is when you step back and realize that the best Neil Gaiman stories have yet to be adapted. His stories have found some success on the screen, both small and big. Coraline was a reasonably successful adaptation, mostly for its unique aesthetics. Stardust was also fairly successful, however it was not my favorite. Gaiman's Neverwhere was a short lived television series that he later adapted into a novel (kind of reverse adaptation). Gaiman's best works have widely been considered too complex to adapt, and for good reason. Sandman is perhaps the best comic book ever written (though an adaptation was announced featuring Joseph Gordon Levitt, I'll believe it when I see it). Anansi Boys, a spiritual sequel to American Gods, is just as rich as Sandman and its predecessor, and may figure into the American Gods adaptation as well as possibly finding a home on the BBC. And finally, of course, American Gods, arguably Gaiman's magnum opus, hasn't been adapted until now. 
       Perhaps the most exciting bit of news is arguably the most obvious: Neil Gaiman's involvement. No one is saying he's writing the episodes, directing the episodes or completely involved in the series at all. But the fact that he's a Producer means at least, if nothing else,  it's being done with his approval. The fact that he's involved in any capacity makes me extremely hopeful that it will be done right. We've seen too many adaptations of great material get ruined by inept writers and directors. With Gaiman being involved, I'm sure that he'll get it done right. Even without Gaiman, Fuller and Greene are more than capable of making this show a winner. I can't wait to hear casting announcements for the show; I would love to see Lee Pace (of Fuller's Pushing Daisies and Wonderfalls) in just about any role.